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Where families live has profound implications for their access to opportunity. Our neighborhoods are the entry points to schools, transportation, jobs, health care, parks, and other local amenities. Where we live also determines who we interact with day to day, from professional networks and classmates to casual social interactions. To allow people of all races equal access to local housing markets, the 1968 Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination by landlords, mortgage lenders, real estate agents, and other housing-related intermediaries. Studies have shown that racial segregation has declined across many U.S. cities over the past 50 years, moving away from the “chocolate city, vanilla suburbs” pattern that dominated 20th century metros. However, my recent research finds that there are still stark differences in where people of different races live.

Metro areas are still racially segregated

Where families live has profound implications for their access to opportunity. Our neighborhoods are the entry points to schools, transportation, jobs, health care, parks, and other local amenities…


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