CIVICS DECK – What is a Filibuster?

The Guardian sees the filibuster as a way for a relatively small group of senators to block some action by the majority. The filibuster rule allows a minority of 41 senators (out of 100 total) to prevent a vote on most species of legislation. This political strategy takes advantage of a U.S. Senate rule that says a senator, once recognized on the floor, may speak on an issue without being impeded by anyone, thus allowing senators to speak for hours to delay efforts to vote for a bill.

There is no filibuster in the House of Representatives because rules adopted in that larger legislative body strictly limit the amount of time each representative may speak on the House floor.

The Unseen Heritage of Black Women Working for the Vote

Although the subject of Black female activists fighting for voting rights has been rehashed in the media in the 2020 Presidential Election and the US Senate runoffs in Georgia. It was clear that Black female voting rights activists were pivotal in affecting the change to a new administration. In January, coinciding with the runoffs, Time reprinted a November article illuminating the chronicle of Black women activists that started out fighting for the women’s vote, a story that begins long before the recent historic efforts in Georgia. It is this overlooked history of dedication to progressing forward that today’s Black female organizers fighting for the vote recognize, build upon, and respect. It was evident in November and January, that the under-recognized work by Black women activists, past and present, opens doors and impacts people of all races and genders and will be the key in the continued fight for voting equality.

Georgia Fund Donations Request

How best to help in Georgia

The BEST way to elect progressives is to invest in the grassroots organizing groups that are on the ground 24/7/365 doing the work to go beyond platitudes and instead are achieving public policy wins for normally marginalized people at the local, state and national levels.

They also help these people organize themselves so that they can advocate for their own priorities — a novel concept— which leads to them BEING and, importantly, FEELING empowered. This leads to increased trust in institutions and the political system, which in turn grows participation and voter turnout.

How my Uncle Elbert helped to change the voting history of Haywood County, Tennessee (with VIDEO)

In an unexpected “win” for voting rights and justice, it was discovered recently Haywood County, Tennessee, was overwhelmingly blue in a sea of red. Historians and analysts (and myself) think there might be a correlation with the dark past and conciliatory and healing efforts that have taken place in Haywood County in recent years.

Change only happens when people wanted something different. My Uncle Elbert was prescribed a life that he didn’t want to take “as is” so he fought for something different and better for himself and the people he loved. The residents in Haywood County have made a statement, through their votes, that they want something different for Haywood County and America.

PEG Exclusive – The Electoral College Part I of II

New and experienced voters are often confused as to what is the electoral college, how is this elite group comprised, and why, in this day and age, we continue to use this artifact. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won several million more votes from the American People than Donald Trump. However, Trump won based on the number of electoral college votes. Who are these people? Are we getting screwed or is there something that we are missing? Let’s start by considering why it exists in the first place.