Events and opportunities to mark the January 6 Insurrection

The first anniversary of the victory of democracy over autocracy (or worse) on January 6th will take place on Thursday of this week. If you have not already made plans to commemorate January 6th, check out Defend Democracy’s website, which lists hundreds of in-person and virtual events. Speaker Pelosi has arranged for a series of events in Washington D.C., including a moment of silence in the House, remarks by President Biden and Vice-President Harris.

CNN will host a two-hour special at 8 pm EST that will include live interviews with members of the House and the Capitol Police about their experiences on January 6.

Perspective on the Freedom to Vote Act and the Filibuster

The Freedom to Vote Act remains in suspended animation in the Senate as Joe Manchin has failed to convince a single Republican to support the Act. The situation will not change unless and until the Senate carves out an exception to the filibuster for voting rights legislation. A group of scholars representing dozens of universities has published a statement urging the Senate to modify the filibuster to pass the Freedom to Vote Act.

The Road to Fascism

Critical Race Theory originated as a body of scholarship analyzing systematic racism. It alleges that racism is systemic and evident in all aspects of American society, including health care, housing, economics, education, clean water, and the criminal justice system. Over generations, this system has given white people enormous advantages while compounding disadvantages for Black people and other minorities.

Protect our children from COVID

The Michigan Senate Education Committee advanced a series of bills that would bar local school districts from requiring masks and other measures to keep students and educators safe, denying schools the basic tools that are needed in order to keep their children in attendance and healthy.

Schools, as reported by A2D2-Ann Arbor inDivisible Dems, are placed in a difficult position. If infection rates get high enough that closing would be considered, under the new education budget rules, the schools could lose their state funding if 75% of students in a district aren’t in attendance for 180 days.