Events and opportunities to mark the January 6 Insurrection

The first anniversary of the victory of democracy over autocracy (or worse) on January 6th will take place on Thursday of this week. If you have not already made plans to commemorate January 6th, check out Defend Democracy’s website, which lists hundreds of in-person and virtual events. Speaker Pelosi has arranged for a series of events in Washington D.C., including a moment of silence in the House, remarks by President Biden and Vice-President Harris.

CNN will host a two-hour special at 8 pm EST that will include live interviews with members of the House and the Capitol Police about their experiences on January 6.

The Road to Fascism

Critical Race Theory originated as a body of scholarship analyzing systematic racism. It alleges that racism is systemic and evident in all aspects of American society, including health care, housing, economics, education, clean water, and the criminal justice system. Over generations, this system has given white people enormous advantages while compounding disadvantages for Black people and other minorities.

100 year anniversary of Tulsa, Oklahoma Greenwood Massacre

May 31, 2021, marks the 100 year anniversary of the Tulsa, Oklahoma Greenwood massacre. Listen to survivors of the Tulsa race massacre share their memories of Greenwood before a White mob attacked the affluent community 100 years ago in “Tulsa 1921: An American Tragedy.” The special airs Monday, May 31, at 10 p.m. ET on CBS.
Tulsa is currently taking action to find and identify victims who were buried in mass graves. MSN describes some of this activity. Both the New York Times and Atlantic articles provide an outstanding overview of this tragic event.

Georgia Fund Donations Request

How best to help in Georgia

The BEST way to elect progressives is to invest in the grassroots organizing groups that are on the ground 24/7/365 doing the work to go beyond platitudes and instead are achieving public policy wins for normally marginalized people at the local, state and national levels.

They also help these people organize themselves so that they can advocate for their own priorities — a novel concept— which leads to them BEING and, importantly, FEELING empowered. This leads to increased trust in institutions and the political system, which in turn grows participation and voter turnout.

Acknowledgement of Indigenous Peoples at Thanksgiving 2020

This Thanksgiving, PEG is featuring a guest contribution from Patricia Anderson, a member of Temple Beth Emeth that acknowledges and honors indigenous peoples in Michigan. We say the words, “We acknowledge with respect,” but are we who live here now truly being respectful of the gifts and losses of the people who shared their lands with us? It was suggested that perhaps, as a small gesture of respect, of thanks beyond the words of acknowledgment, some of us may wish to make a contribution to local organizations that support Native American communities in Michigan with food and other resources.

How my Uncle Elbert helped to change the voting history of Haywood County, Tennessee (with VIDEO)

In an unexpected “win” for voting rights and justice, it was discovered recently Haywood County, Tennessee, was overwhelmingly blue in a sea of red. Historians and analysts (and myself) think there might be a correlation with the dark past and conciliatory and healing efforts that have taken place in Haywood County in recent years.

Change only happens when people wanted something different. My Uncle Elbert was prescribed a life that he didn’t want to take “as is” so he fought for something different and better for himself and the people he loved. The residents in Haywood County have made a statement, through their votes, that they want something different for Haywood County and America.